Image from web page 517 of “The Ladies’ house journal” (1889)

Some cool china big size mold photos:

Image from page 517 of “The Ladies’ house journal” (1889)
china large size mold
Image by World wide web Archive Book Pictures
Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ property journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Net Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: World wide web Archive

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Text Appearing Just before Image:
cy$ &ampxa%ma. Thrilling surprises in store for youwhen you see and use the 1948 Tappan. cy$ &amp/afima&amp Delicious meals … cooked automati-cally. . . although youre away from homeif you wish… All the other Tappan functions thatgood cooks want. . . renowned TappanDivided Top… added roomy VisualiteChrome-lined Oven with see-via glass door…and several cook-ing conveniences as listed beneath. * * *Youll have to see it to think it.. .ask your dealer for a demonstrationof the 1948 Tappan Gas Variety. Spe-cially engineered models for LP(bottled or tank) Gas. The TappanStove Co., Dept. 10, Mansfield, Ohio. , Best • OVERSIZE CHROME VISUALITE OVEN • CLOCK Handle OF OVEN Choose wisely• ••choose Tappan

Text Appearing After Image:
E JOURNAL which has stood in hot water for a even though. Inone regional grocery store here Ive located guavajelly put up in 12-ounce glasses in an additional,it comes in 15-ounre tins. Ive madecajeta with hoth sizes, using the samehasic recipe as to proportions of liquidsand gelatin. The hot liquid will dissolvethe jelly, but its a great notion to whip it alittle with a rotary heater to he positive thereare no lumps. Add three tablespoons lemonjuice and 54 cup pineapple juice left fromthe canned pineapple for the salad. If youlike, /i cup sherry may be substituted forthe pineapple juice. Rub person moldsor one huge mold with a tiny salad oil andfill with the mixture. Place in refrigeratorto set. A day-just before job, of course. (REAM-CHEESE SAUCE Let 6 ounces cream cheese stand at roomtemperature to soften. Add to it -H cup topmilk and blend till perfectly smooth. To serve, unmold jelly onto a platter orindividual dessert plates and garnish withseedless green grapes. The pale green grapeslook so fairly aga

Note About Pictures
Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned web page photos that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations may not completely resemble the original work.

Image from page 847 of “The Ladies’ home journal” (1889)
china large size mold
Image by Internet Archive Book Pictures
Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ property journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Net Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Photos From Book

Click here to view book on-line to see this illustration in context in a browseable on the internet version of this book.

Text Appearing Just before Image:
No. 690—Think what this tulip-brightened dress does for the shorter, fuller figure. Draped neckline . . . button front, skirt knowingly handled. Exclusive Parisian print on Enka Rayon Sheer. Silver Grey, Tulip Pink, Spring Blue. Illusion sizes, 16^-22^. Beneath .00 MARTHA MANNINGS COMB IN ILLUSION HALF SIZESMARTHA MANNING GARMENT Organization • SAINT LOUIS 180 LADIES Residence JOl I! l.

Text Appearing Following Image:
£as&lt| aid added delic/o«s with Knox KNOX TONGING tor an extra-vibrant, tangy– salad to spark up family members meals? Makethis Tomato King. So simple with Knox,and due to the fact Knox is pure, unfiavoredgelatine, you get all that true, tomatoflavor. For organization, try the heavenly SPICY TOMATO RING (Serves (i utilizes , pkg.)Soften: 1 envelope Knox Gelatinein: A cup cold water Lei 1 his stand.Mix: 2 cups tomato juice or canned or fresh tomatoes2 bay leaves1 teaspoon salt 1 stalk celery, chopped 4 teaspoons grated onionDash cayenne pepper Simmer ten minutes. Strain. Stir in gelatine on! d dissolved. Add: two tablespoons mild vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juicePour into large ri 11 ^ mold thai has beenrinsed in cold water. Chill. When firm,unmold on lettuce. Fill center withmixed vegetable salad Ereah or cooked).Serve with dressing. Note: To make thissalad with tomato puree, dilute 1 cuppuree wit h 1 cup water. V.5. Totally free —write to Jane Knox. Box LH-2. Johnstown. NY . tor her beauti-totally illustrated recipe

Note About Photos
Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned web page photos that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations might not completely resemble the original perform.

Image from web page 173 of “Bulbs: a treatise on hardy and tender bulbs and tubers” (1866)
china large size mold
Image by Internet Archive Book Photos
Identifier: bulbstreatiseonh00rand
Title: Bulbs: a treatise on hardy and tender bulbs and tubers
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Rand, Edward Sprague, 1834-1897
Subjects: Bulbs (Plants)
Publisher: Boston, J. E. Tilton
Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries

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Text Appearing Prior to Image:
ered. The accounts of its size, beauty, andfragrance, are not exaggerated. The credit of introducingthis splendid lily belongs to New England. It wasbrought from Japan in 18G0 by F. Gordon Dexter, Esq.,who placed it in the hands of Francis Lee, Esq., by whomit was bloomed in the summer season of 1861. In the spring of18G2, Mr. Lee transferred it to Francis Parkman, Esq., azealous amateur, who exhibited it at the MassachusettsHorticultural Exhibition on the Btli of July of the sameyear, and described it in The Gardeners Month-to-month. Itwas bloomed in England this very same year (18G2) for the firsttime. 168 THE LILY. L. venustum. — This stunning species is often importedunder the names of 7v. testaceum, superhum^ and peregriniunand sending for any of these to Holland will bring a goodsupply of L. venustum and, certainly, a single can scarcely havetoo many. The plant is hardy, grows well in any garden-soil, and produces massive spikes of nodding buff or creamyorange flowers. It likes a wealthy soil not also wet.

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
The greenhouse species are of easy culture in loam andleaf-mould with a little sharp sand. They call for largepots a lot of water, light, and air, although in development and THE LILY. 169 are beuefited by waterings of weak manure-water. Amongthe tender species might be talked about L. gujanteum^ avery line species from the Ilimahiyas, with large whiteflowers L. roseiim, with rosy-purple flowers, from India L. Thompsonianum, an Indian species, with rosy flowers L. WaUichianum, from Nepaul, with greenish-white flow-ers and L. concolor, a native of China, with brilliant redflowers. There are numerous other lilies in cultivation, and manyhybrids, to which it would be dillicult to assign their trueposition. Later years have shown many to be hardywhich have been as soon as reputed tender, and the future may showfurther progress in the same direction. The various species and varieties hybridize freely andthere is no flower which presents higher attractions forthe skill of the botanist or the experiments

Note About Pictures
Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned page pictures that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations might not perfectly resemble the original work.

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